Hexy

Hexy by Cheri McEwen
By Cheri McEwen

Photos: Cheri McEwen

With Spring breezes on the mind and the buds getting ready on the trees, it is still too cool to go without some kind of warmth while perusing the yard or taking young ones to the park. Hexy is a half circle shawl that has plenty of open work to keep the shawl from getting too warm, but solid enough to provide warmth. It can be scrunched up around the neck to make it more of a scarf or allowed to hang and wrap around for a little something extra on the shoulders.

Hexy can be made to any size desired by continuing to repeat the main body pattern. If made large enough, it would be a great décor item to place over a chair or on the back of a sofa.


Difficulty: Easy

Size: Variable

Finished Measurements: 25 inches deep X 56 inches wide after blocking (as written)

Materials:

  • Paton’s Angora Bamboo [55% viscose, 35% wool, 10% angora; 80yd/73m per 50g skein] color: Olive Green, 4 skeins; Rust, 2 skeins; Ivory, 1 skein
  • J/10 (6mm) hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Pins for blocking

Gauge: Gauge is not significant in this design.

Notes: The main body pattern can be worked as many times as desired. There are two options for finishing listed in the pattern.

Special Stitches
Beg Shell: slip stitch from outer edge to the ch-2 space of the first shell, slip stitch into ch 2 space, ch3, then work (dc, ch2, 2dc) into the ch-2 sp

Dc2tog/ dc3tog: Double crochet 2 or 3 stitches together

Shell: (2 double crochets, ch 2, 2 double crochets) into indicated stitch or space

V-st: (dc, ch2, dc) into designated st or sp

Hexy by Cheri McEwen

Directions

Ch 4. In fourth ch from hook: (dc, ch 2) 3 times, make 2 dc, turn work.

Row 1: Sl st between the first 2 sts, ch3. (Dc, ch 2, make 2 dc) into the same spot where the sl st was performed, (ch 2, shell into the dc of previous row) twice, ch 2, shell between final 2 sts, turn work.

Row 2: Beg shell, (ch 2, make 3 dc in ch-2 sp, ch 2, shell over shell) 3 times, turn work.

Row 3: Beg shell, (shell in ch-2 sp, sk 3dc, shell in ch-2 sp, shell over shell) 3 times, turn work.

Row 4: Beg shell, (ch 2, make 3 dc in ch-2 sp of shell, ch 2, make 3 dc in ch-2 sp of next shell, ch 2, shell over shell) 3 times, turn work.

Row 5: Beg shell, shell in each ch-2 sp across row, including the shell over shell. (12 shells and one beg shell)

Row 6: Beg shell, [(ch 2, make 3 dc in ch-2 sp of shell) 3 times, ch 2, shell over shell] 3 times.

Row 7: Repeat Row 5 (15 shells and one beg shell)

Row 8: Beg shell, [(ch 2, make 3 dc in ch-2 sp of shell) 4 times, ch 2, shell over shell] 3 times.

Continue repeating rows 7 and 8 (increasing the bold number by one each time) until the body is desired length. For simple edging, stop with a row 8 repeat and finish off and weave in ends. For a more complex edging continue from row 7 with the edging.

Edging:

Row 1: Beg shell, (ch 2, make 3 dc into each ch-2 sp until you get to the line of division shells, shell over shell) 3 times.

Row 2: Beg shell, [(ch 2, make 2 dc in next st, dc in middle st, 2 dc in next st) to division shell; ch 2, shell over shell] 3 times.

Row 3: Beg shell, [(ch 3, dc2tog, dc, dc2tog) to division shell, ch 3, shell over shell] 3 times.

Row 4: Beg shell, [(ch 2, dc in ch-3 sp, ch 2, dc3tog) to final ch-3 sp. Ch 2, dc in ch-3 sp, ch 2, shell over shell] 3 times.

Row 5: Beg shell, (V-st in top of each dc and each 3dctog to the division line of shells, shell over shell) 3 times.

Row 6: Beg shell, (dc, ch 1, dc, ch 3, dc, ch 1, dc) in ch-2 sp of each V-st and each division line shell to final edge, shell over shell.

FINISHING
Fasten off and weave in ends. To achieve the pointed look of the one pictured, insert a pin into each ch-3 space along the edging during blocking.

Hexy by Cheri McEwen

About the Designer
Cheri McEwen I’m a Stay-at-home mom who designs for fun. I love simple, clean lines that still provide interest through the stitches used. Lace, color, and texture all inspire my designs and appeal to my design sense.

Pattern & images © Cheri McEwen. All rights reserved.

5 responses

    • Since the shawl can be made to any size, it is kind of up to you to decide how much yarn to use. The prototype used approximately 600 yards of worsted weight and is long enough to come down to my backside. If you are using a lighter weight yarn, then more yardage will be required to get the same size. I would suggest 800 yards of fingering weight yarn and maybe 900 yards of lace weight to achieve the same size after blocking. I hope that helps!

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